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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Git

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
The Bible never refers to the humans trying to return, so I can only assume He sprayed some effective pesticides.


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mkalus
11 days ago
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iPhone: 49.287476,-123.142136
astranoir
11 days ago
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1 public comment
kyounger
11 days ago
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What? The entire story of the Bible is about mankind's struggle in this regard, and how Jesus reconciled that struggle.
timdiggerm
10 days ago
It is a joke.
kyounger
10 days ago
I think the original comic is humorous. It's the hovertext that misses the mark.
timdiggerm
9 days ago
Although I know what you mean from a theological perspective, he's literally correct.

大きな生き物7

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大きな生き物7

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astranoir
14 days ago
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🐶 🐰
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On Google Reader

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Yesterday, I tweeted about missing Google Reader:

The tweet touched a nerve; lots of folks have chimed in, mostly agreeing with the sentiment or recommending substitutes.

To be clear, I still read RSS feeds every day. (I use Reeder on the Mac and iOS and synch my feeds using Feedly.) Although I’m open to exploring alternatives, I’m not unsatisfied with my current arrangement. (Ringing endorsement!) So I’m mostly not lamenting the loss of Google Reader’s functionality. Instead, I miss what Google Reader represented: a major technology company supporting a truly decentralized publishing platform.

Google’s brand imparted some degree of credibility to an emergent ecosystem. I suspect a nontrivial number of people must’ve tried RSS feeds because Google provided a tool to read them. It’s great that tools like Feedly, Reeder, Feedbin, NetNewsWire, etc. exist, but none of them have the broad appeal or brand power that Google does.

I said I’m “mostly” not lamenting the loss of Google Reader’s functionality. This is because while current RSS readers offer the basics, Reader was a natural, cohesive component of my personal information ecosystem. Unsurprisingly, it looked and felt like (and integrated with) other Google tools like Gmail and Google Calendar, which I was using extensively at the time. As befit a Google product, Reader also offered excellent search capabilities. None of the RSS readers I’ve tried since offer the same level of coherence and integration that I experienced with Google Reader.

I sense Google Reader was a casualty of Google’s primary business model: selling its users’ attention to the highest bidder. I doubt RSS provided the scale or control required to run a mass advertising business. IMO it’s no coincidence that Google pulled the plug on Reader at a time when centralized social networks (Facebook, Twitter) were gaining traction in the mainstream. (Google+, which the company had launched a couple of years earlier, failed to take off. I wonder if they saw Reader as competition for G+?)

Six years after Google Reader’s disappearance, we’re wiser to the limits of centralized control over news aggregation. Subjectively, I sense many people are rediscovering the joys of blogging. (And, like me, using the social networks mostly as a way to publicize our blog posts.) Podcasts — which are based on syndicated feeds — seem to be more popular every year. While I miss Google Reader, I believe decentralized syndication is an essential part of the web’s future — not just its past. Is the time right for Google (or any of the other major tech platform companies) to embrace the platform again?



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astranoir
14 days ago
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Yes!
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tastefullyoffensive: Nailed it. (via conorsmith)

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tastefullyoffensive:

Nailed it. (via conorsmith)

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astranoir
24 days ago
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...
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Photo

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astranoir
60 days ago
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when i came out as trans

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flutternoir:

everydayatleast:

yensidlove:

[ or, toxic masculinity from the perspective of a trans guy ]

when i came out as trans my warm and loving family supported me

but they treated me differently

when i came out as trans my dad asked if he should start slapping me on the back and socking me in the arm instead of hugging me.

when i came out as trans my mom wanted to know if i would still got with her on fun trips to the mall to buy clothes and home decor items.

when i came out as trans my grandfather looked positively startled and overjoyed when i kissed his cheek and told him to drive safe.

when i came out as trans my grandmother asked if it was okay if she hugged me in public or if it would embarrass me.

when i came out as trans my dad told me that he had a lot to teach me— he said this because i told him i thought make up was fun.

when i came out as trans my aunt apologized for kissing me on the forehead.

when i came out as trans my uncle gave me a handshake rather than a hug.

when i came out as trans my cousins hesitated to hug me at the door.

when i came out as trans my family hesitated to show me the casual affection and platonic love they had previously felt free to give.

end toxic masculinity.

show your sons as much affection as you would show your daughters.

let your sons indulge in beauty when they want to and always support them.

do not think for one second that the societal expectation of masculinity is more important than the individual feelings and needs of someone you love.

IF YOU DON’T THINK TOXIC MASCULINITY IS REAL, READ THIS

SMASHING THAT REBLOG BUTTON

SAY IT LOUDER FOR THE PEOPLE IN THE BACK

Toxic masculinity is so engraved in my brain that when I came out I was the one scared of hugging people and kissing my family and showing affection in the same way I had been doing…

End toxic masculinity

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astranoir
79 days ago
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